San Diego 2049: Opening Events

October 12 and 13, 2018


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Opening Events for San Diego 2049:

 

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Student Info Session 

with organizing GPS Professor John Ahlquist (refreshments provided) 

October 8, 5:00–6:00pm,Robinson Complex room 3202 (refreshments provided)

An opportunity for UC San Diego graduate students interested in participating in the San Diego 2049 competition and Certificate in Speculative Design for Policy Making to learn more about the program and how to take part.

 

Worldbuilding: Scenarios, for Fun and for Survival

Program kickoff public lecture with Vernor Vinge

October 12, 5–7pm, Robinson Auditorium, UC San Diego

Free and open to the public; RSVP required (click here)

Light reception to follow

Learn about the complex process of science fiction worldbuilding to construct a dynamic future scenario with one of the masters of the field, Vernor Vinge.

220px-VernorVinge_RainbowsEndThe much acclaimed science fiction writer Vernor Vinge is author, among other books, of Rainbows End, which takes place, in part, on a future UC San Diego campus. Vinge has won five Hugo Awards, including one for each of his last three novels, Upon the Deep (1992), A Deepness in the Sky (1999), and Rainbows End (2006). Known for his rigorous hard-science approach to his science fiction, he became an iconic figure among cybernetic scientists with the publication in 1981 of his novella "True Names," which is considered a seminal, visionary work of Internet fiction and cyberspace. Dr. Vinge is Emeritus professor of mathematics and computer science at San Diego State University and also noted, among other things, for introducing the term “the singularity.” 

 

Worldbuilding Workshop with Ann Pendleton-Jullian 

and initial project brainstorming/team-building

October 13, 9am–1pm, Robinson Complex 3106, UC San Diego

Mandatory/open only to UC San Diego graduate students; RSVP required (click here)

APJThis hands-on workshop will equip you with the tools to begin developing a future scenario of your own devising, as well as serve as an opportunity to connect with other graduate students to form teams.

Ann Pendleton-Jullian is an architect, writer, and educator whose work explores the interchange between culture, environment, and technology. From a first short career in astrophysics, Pendleton-Jullian has come to see the world through a lens of complexity framed by principles from ecology theory. This, in tandem with a belief that design has the power to take on the complex challenges associated with an emergent highly networked global culture has led her to work on architecture projects that range in scale and scope from things to systems of action—from a house for the astronomer Carl Sagan, to a seven village ecosystem for craft-based tourism in Guizhou province, China—and in domains outside of architecture including patient centered health, new innovation models for K-12 and higher ed, and human and economic development in marginalized populations.

Prior to the Knowlton School she was a tenured professor at MIT for fourteen years. She is also a core member of a cross-disciplinary network of global leaders established by the Secretary of Defense to examine questions of emerging interest. As a writer, she has most recently finished a manuscript Design Unbound, with co-author John Seely Brown, that presents a new tool set for designing within complex systems and on complex problems endemic to the 21st century.

 

About San Diego 2049:

The School of Global Policy and Strategy is celebrating its 30th anniversary by partnering with the Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination to produce San Diego 2049, a series of programs through 2018–19 that will use the imagination and narrative tools of science fiction to stimulate complex thinking about the future and the ways we could shape it through policy, technology, innovation, culture, and social change.

The largest challenges facing life on earth—climate change; the possible emergence of new autonomous, intelligences; the decentralized ability to edit genetic material—are multi-generational, contingent, and uncertain. Choices taken today will have hard-to-foresee consequences; the pace of technological change means that policy choices may struggle to keep up.

If we are to leave the earth in better shape than we found it, successful social choices will require us to imagine distant alternate futures that reflect our best knowledge about how humans behave and evolve socially, politically, and cognitively. Science fiction gives us the needed space for long-range speculation and the complex interactions of technological, political, and social change.

Imagining the future helps us react to unanticipated situations—futures that we did not imagine. This competition and event series foster diverse visions for San Diego in 2049 from UC San Diego graduate students and draws on research by faculty across divisions. By bringing together students, science fiction writers, faculty, policy makers, and industry experts, we aim to foster the kind of multi-modal, boundary-crossing thinking that we need today to anticipate the potential shape of the world thirty years from now.

The San Diego 2049 student competition, open to graduate students from all disciplines at UC San Diego, provides hands-on experience in sophisticated futurist forecasting and science fictional thought experiments to develop robust scenarios, clarify problems, and develop policy solutions in an emergent near-future. Student teams will have the opportunity to learn from science fiction writers and futurists, and be paired with a GPS faculty member for guidance on policy implications. Through workshops and panels, teams will develop their worldbuilding skills. Mini-grants will be available to assist in the creation of their own interventions in these futures, empowering students to take ownership over the complex ways in which our actions in the present influence the shape of the world a generation from now.

For more information, please see the San Diego 2049 website.

 

Parking 

The closest parking to Robinson Auditorium is in the Pangea Parking Structure on Pangea Drive & Scholars Drive North. Visitor parking passes can be purchased for $3/hour or $30/day.

Parking pay stations do not dispense change. Pay with any combination of the following:

  • Cash — $1 and $5 bills only
  • Visa, MasterCard, or American Express

Click here for interactive driving directions to the Pangea Parking Structure (Google Map)

From the Pangea Parking Structure, Robinson Auditorium is a short walk to the east. 

Questions?
 
Email us at info@imagination.ucsd.edu.