Dyson & Benford: Foreseeing the Next 35 Years—Where Will We Be in 2054?

January 30, 2019


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Please join us for a special event with Freeman Dyson and Gregory Benford.

Wednesday, January 30, 2019
4:00 - 5:30 p.m. 
Roth Auditorium, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine 
UC San Diego

This event is free and open to the public; RSVP required.

 

35 years after George Orwell wrote the prescient novel 1984, Isaac Asimov looked ahead another 35 years to 2019 to predict the future of nuclear war, computerization, and the utilization of space. The Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination and the Division of Physical Sciences are honored to welcome two living luminaries in the fields of physics and futurism—Freeman Dyson and Gregory Benford (Ph.D. ’67)—to peer ahead another 35 years, to 2054, and share their insights into what may be in store for us.

Professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study, Freeman Dyson is an English-born American theoretical physicist and mathematician. Born in England, he came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied. Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe, Origins of LifeThe Scientist as Rebel, and most recently Maker of Patterns: A Life in Letters. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000, he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Gregory Benford is a physicist, educator, author, and UC San Diego alumnus (MS '65, PhD '67). He is a professor of physics at the University of California, Irvine, where he has been a faculty member since 1971. He is the author of over twenty novels, including In the Ocean of the Night, The Heart of the Comet (with David Brin), Foundation's Fear, Bowl of Heaven (with Larry Niven), Timescape, and The Berlin Project. A two-time winner of the Nebula Award, Benford has also won the John W. Campbell Award, the British Science Fiction Award, the Australian Ditmar Award, the 1990 United Nations Medal in Literature, and the Robert A. Heinlein Award. He has served as an advisor to the Department of Energy, NASA, and the White House Council on Space Policy.

PARKING AND DIRECTIONS:

General parking permits are available for a fee in Parking Lot P384, adjacent to Sanford Consortium. Click here for directions to the Sanford Consortium. For more information about accessible parking on campus, click here.